Child kicked out of class because she smelt like “curry and spices” and made the teacher feel sick.

takealookatyourlife:

Jaswinder Paul, said his 13-year-old daughter, who is of Indian-Maori descent, was asked on Friday to move to another classroom because the teacher felt sickened by her. 

That teacher should be kicked out cause the smell of racism makes me sick. 

thinkspeakstress:

I usually don’t do things like this, but I had bacon this morning and thus am in a giving mood, so. Here you go: Alex’s Guide to Being a Somewhat Decent White Person, in 30 Quick, Easy Steps! (If you can’t handle sarcasm, turn away now)
Note before we begin: This guide is nowhere near all inclusive, and my PoC followers, please feel free to add more, if you’re feeling inclined to do so.
Also note that I do not speak for all PoC.
1. First things first: Recognize that if you’re white, you’re going to fuck up. 100% money back guarantee. Even if you don’t want to, you will. There’s nothing you can do about that. You could be the most anti-racist white person ever. Great. You’re still going to fuck up. Don’t let this discourage you, though! The good news is this: Nobody expects you to be perfect and nobody expects you to not fuck up. We just expect that when you DO fuck up, you take your call-out like a fucking adult, recognize your mistake, apologize, and then move the fuck on, and try your hardest to not make that mistake again. Maybe learn something in the process. That’s it. No, really. That’s it.
2. Recognize that as a white person, you have white privilege whether you want it or not. You have it. Recognize that you benefit from your white privilege, whether you want to benefit from it or not. It’s not a choice. Recognize that because of your white privilege, you benefit from the oppression of PoC, regardless of whether you think that’s fair or not, regardless of whether you want to or not. You don’t get a choice in it any more than we get a choice in not having those same privileges. That’s not something to feel guilty over, it’s something to be conscious of.
3. People of Color are human beings. With actual feelings! And actual lives, and concerns! We feel physical pain! We feel joy! We break our arms, and do silly things, and do serious things, and like leisurely activities! W O W Z E R S
4. Racism is privilege plus power. White people can’t be victims of racism. You have the most power. PoC have no power over you whatsoever. We can discriminate against you. We can be prejudiced against you. We can’t be racist against you. We don’t have the power to oppress you. The end.
5. Approach everything critically. Nearly everything is built upon white supremacist ideals.
6. If you find yourself calling out PoC for how they handle racism, yet have nothing to say to the actual racist, it’s time for you to go the fuck away.One thing I’ve noticed both on Tumblr, and in real life, is that when a white person starts acting racist, other white people will remain silent, but the second a PoC says something against that white person, other white people will come out in defense of that white person’s racist behavior (“You’re being so harsh!” “Strong language like that will get you nowhere!” “How are they supposed to learn if you won’t educate them?” etc etc etc) . That’s unacceptable in ways that even Lemongrab can’t articulate.
7. When your skinfolk are acting out, it’s on YOU to call them out, especially when you see them harassing PoC. If a PoC wants to speak up, let them. But there’s a difference between collecting your folk (always welcome) and flat out talking over us/speaking FOR us (big no-no). Learn the difference.
8. It’s not our jobs to educate white people on their racism, so don’t expect us to. There are PoC who do like to educate, paid or unpaid. Go see them. For an alternate option, open Google and you’ll have all that shit at your fingertips within seconds. But when a PoC is calling you out, they might not feel like giving you an in depth history lesson on the background of that particular act of racism, and to act like they owe it to you is entitlement. If we feel like educating, we will. In fact, there are plenty of Tumblr blogs created with the sole purpose of educating you on racism. Racismschool is a perfect example.
9. That being said, listen to PoC when they talk about racism. If you prefer listening to white people talk about the racism PoC face, rather than listening to PoC, there’s a problem. Tim Wise and other white people say something about racism, and y’all act like this is brand new information and omg he’s BRILLIANT wow so insightful. No, bitch, we’ve been saying this shit for CENTURIES, and white people are just regurgitating what WE said. It’s just that when PoC talk about our experiences, we’re seen as ~reverse racist~ and emotionally biased, and somehow, white people are able to talk about racism objectively even though they have no experience with racism aside from fucking people over with it.
10. If it seems to you that “no matter what white people do, there’s no way they can interact with a PoC without offending them,” then that says a lot about how you view anti-racist discourse, and it’s time for you to take a step back and try again. Instead of reading it as, “white people fuck up everything” try reading it as “I’m frustrated with white people/white supremacy, and here is why…” Most of the shit you read from us flat out GIVES you the answers you’re looking for in one way or another. It’s really not that hard. Stop looking too far into shit.
11. Instead of getting defensive and trivializing issues because you don’t think it’s a big deal why are you so offended by this you’re being over sensitive the world is so PC omg bawwwwwwwww …… LISTEN. And even if you don’t get why what you did/said was offensive, understand that it WAS offensive, period, and just don’t do it again. Sometimes, understanding isn’t necessary, and sometimes you won’t be able to understand, no matter how hard you try. You don’t have to; just stop.
12. Stop saying “nigga.” This goes for white people AND non-Black PoC alike. It’s not cool for you to do it. Black people say it to reclaim it. White people say it, why? Y’all have nothing to reclaim with that word. Non-Black PoC have no business using it either.
13. Yes, that means in songs, too. Y’all can’t sing it just because it’s part of the lyrics. Either mute yourself for half a second, or stop listening to the song until you can gain enough self control to shut the hell up for one word.
14. Seriously, if you aren’t Black, you can’t say it. Ever. EVER. EVER.
15. While we’re at it, when you use a racial slur and PoC who fall victim to that slur call you out on it, for god’s sake, stop saying it. 
16. Recognize that the world doesn’t revolve around white people, despite the ways in which the world will try to tell you it does. (For instance, don’t call us non-white, because that makes, once again, white people the default human and everyone who isn’t white becomes a niche or subtype. You probably didn’t even realize that’s what you were doing, did you? Which is what I mean when I say that this shit is subtle, and engrained in us to the point where it’s hard to detect. Which is fine; sometimes, you just don’t know. It happens. Just be aware that you can only use “I didn’t know” as an excuse once. After you’re informed, you have no excuse. By the way, for future reference, “PoC” will work just fine.)
 17. PoC don’t owe you shit and it would behoove you to not act like we do; when you’re ignorant, we don’t owe you niceness. If you did something that dehumanized us, why would you expect us to be nice to you anyway? That’s abuser logic, racism, and fucked uppedness all rolled into one disgusting package, and if you expect us to swallow it either whole or in pieces, you need to get slapped with a cactus, to be frank.
18. Don’t appropriate. If PoC walk around in our own things, we get harassed, assaulted, told to go back to our countries, viewed as suspicious, and at worst, killed. But when white people wear them, it’s cute, trendy, and omg, you’re so worldly. Our cultures are not costumes, fashion trends, or objects to be picked over, the pretty parts taken and the rest discarded. Even if you’re wearing it to appreciate our culture? Don’t. Appropriation isn’t appreciation, it’s disrespect. Period. (And if you think that “Well then maybe you should take off your jeans since those are from white culture and you’re appropriating har har” is an intelligent response then please dip your lips in hot wax, because no no NO.)
19. “NOT ALL WHITE PEOPLE—” Shut the fuck up. 
20. Just because one PoC doesn’t find something racist to be offensive, doesn’t mean that it suddenly isn’t offensive, and that it’s okay for you to continue on with whatever you’re doing. For examples, see 15.
21. If you’re being called out for something, recognize how much energy this person is out right now. Seriously, calling people out isn’t fun, because we KNOW how it’s likely to be received. We KNOW what people are likely to think about us. We KNOW how people are likely to take a call out.We KNOW that nine times out of ten, we’re just going to be shut down. We have to pick our battles; if we called out everything, we’d be calling shit out every second of our lives. (And it’s not fair that we have to let some things pass silently, because that gives the impression that what was said/done is okay and not problematic, which isn’t true) It’s not fun. It’s not something we look forward to doing. So when we DO do it, please just listen. Please recognize that it’s not us trying to kill your fun or ruin your day, or us hating you or thinking you’re a terrible person. We’re just trying to gain back the piece of our humanity that you put your foot all over.
22. Being called a racist isn’t worse than whatever racist act you just committed/racist thing you said. So save your boo hoo hurt fee-fee tears for somebody who gives a fuck because I guarantee it won’t be us. Also, being called out for doing something offensive doesn’t mean we called you racist. It doesn’t even mean we think you’re racist. It means you did something problematic and we’re trying to correct you on it so that you won’t do it again.
23. So you got called out and it upset you. Go cry me a god damn river.  Guess what? Being called out isn’t SUPPOSED to feel good. It’s not supposed to feel like a pat on the back. Expecting a call out to feel good is like denying somebodies humanity and then expecting them to give you hugs and cookies in return. No, it’s not LIKE that, it IS that. In the same vein, if you get called out by more than one person, and choose to listen to the one who you think was nicer about it? Then fuck you. Both are people expressing their hurt and both are valid, and for you to ignore one in favor of the other—and especially to praise them via “Thank you for being polite/carrying on an intelligent discourse rather than screaming incoherently/etc etc etc” is tone policing as well as trying to set up a Good PoC, Bad PoC dichotomy, and fuck you very much if you engage in that.
24. Whatever racist thing you did or said, you’re not the first white person we’ve dealt with who has done/said it. You’re probably somewhere in the thousands. Know what that means? We’ve dealt with others exactly like you, several times over. That gets annoying the second time around. By the time you strike, we’re fed up with it. So if we just tell you to fuck off, please respect our wishes and do so. We deal with micro-aggressions and blatant and subtle racism day in and day out, every single day, from the day we are born until the day that we die. So if we aren’t the nicest to you, don’t get mad at us for not being polite enough. Be mad at yourself for having done/said something racist and making our day just a little bit shittier with your ignorance. Your racist acts are your fault. You did em. Don’t get mad when you have to deal with consequences for them. If we’re old enough to deal with racism at fucking two years old, then you’re old enough to deal with the consequences at 15, 16, 20, 30,56, 89, 314.
25. Keeping all of the above in mind, remember that we’re all individuals. The best way to deal with PoC is by treating us like the human beings we are, and being constantly aware of your privilege. When you fuck up, apologize, try not to do it again, and move on. It’s not that hard.
26. Cracker isn’t a racial slur. Neither is honky. Neither is curdled milk, cottage cheese, mayonnaise, or white bread. Let it drop.  Sorry you aren’t oppressed for your skin color, white people. It must suck not having to deal with racial oppression. Truly. I’m sorry for your misfortune.
27. Intersectionality or shut the fuck up. PoC come in all flavors. We’re queer. We have mental health issues. We have disabilities. We deal with sizeism, misogyny, ableism, and so on. If you think bringing up race in conversations about other oppressions is inappropriate, then take a long hard seat and stay down until summoned.
28.  “It’s just a word, it only has as much power as you give it.” NO.
29. Having a PoC spouse, S.O., family member, acquaintance, co-worker, doesn’t mean you can’t be racist or do racist shit. You can, you have, and you will again.  And if you make that argument and use them as your get out of jail free card, you’re being racist in that moment because you’re turning them into an excuse to combat being called out for acting like a fucking fool.
If the above is too difficult or too much for you, then there is an alternate solution:
1.  Stay away from all PoC, and don’t engage with a single one until you’ve changed your attitude because the last thing PoC need is to be exposed to your ignorance and lack of consideration for their humanity.
Remember that there’s way more than what I’ve listed. Anything here that upset you or made you feel uncomfortable, you should go back and read again, and question very carefully why it made you upset, and then confront your issues. And if I somehow pissed you off, just remember… you asked.



Ok then someone edited this post, completely erased the initial commentary above and REPLACED all 30 pts with this

professor-mod:

Just act normally and treat everybody the same way.  If you treat people differently because of their skin color, that’s being racist, even if you are treating non-white people better than because of their skin color.  Honestly, if you spend enough time not thinking about race, it stops being an issue to you, and if someone gets upset with you for treating everyone equally, well, that’s damn racist of them for expecting you to treat certain groups differently.  It is not an individual’s responsibility to apologize for society.  It is an individual’s job to treat everyone with respect, basic human dignity, and have equal expectations of others regardless of their complexion.  Honestly the only reason this still keeps coming up is that some some people are being racist.  You don’t solve the problem harping on it, you solve the problem by stopping doing it.




Can anyone else see how and why the silencing professor-mod did was bad?

thinkspeakstress:

I usually don’t do things like this, but I had bacon this morning and thus am in a giving mood, so. Here you go: Alex’s Guide to Being a Somewhat Decent White Person, in 30 Quick, Easy Steps! (If you can’t handle sarcasm, turn away now)

Note before we begin: This guide is nowhere near all inclusive, and my PoC followers, please feel free to add more, if you’re feeling inclined to do so.

Also note that I do not speak for all PoC.

1. First things first: Recognize that if you’re white, you’re going to fuck up. 100% money back guarantee. Even if you don’t want to, you will. There’s nothing you can do about that. You could be the most anti-racist white person ever. Great. You’re still going to fuck up. Don’t let this discourage you, though! The good news is this: Nobody expects you to be perfect and nobody expects you to not fuck up. We just expect that when you DO fuck up, you take your call-out like a fucking adult, recognize your mistake, apologize, and then move the fuck on, and try your hardest to not make that mistake again. Maybe learn something in the process. That’s it. No, really. That’s it.

2. Recognize that as a white person, you have white privilege whether you want it or not. You have it. Recognize that you benefit from your white privilege, whether you want to benefit from it or not. It’s not a choice. Recognize that because of your white privilege, you benefit from the oppression of PoC, regardless of whether you think that’s fair or not, regardless of whether you want to or not. You don’t get a choice in it any more than we get a choice in not having those same privileges. That’s not something to feel guilty over, it’s something to be conscious of.

3. People of Color are human beings. With actual feelings! And actual lives, and concerns! We feel physical pain! We feel joy! We break our arms, and do silly things, and do serious things, and like leisurely activities! W O W Z E R S

4. Racism is privilege plus power. White people can’t be victims of racism. You have the most power. PoC have no power over you whatsoever. We can discriminate against you. We can be prejudiced against you. We can’t be racist against you. We don’t have the power to oppress you. The end.

5. Approach everything critically. Nearly everything is built upon white supremacist ideals.

6. If you find yourself calling out PoC for how they handle racism, yet have nothing to say to the actual racist, it’s time for you to go the fuck away.One thing I’ve noticed both on Tumblr, and in real life, is that when a white person starts acting racist, other white people will remain silent, but the second a PoC says something against that white person, other white people will come out in defense of that white person’s racist behavior (“You’re being so harsh!” “Strong language like that will get you nowhere!” “How are they supposed to learn if you won’t educate them?” etc etc etc) . That’s unacceptable in ways that even Lemongrab can’t articulate.

7. When your skinfolk are acting out, it’s on YOU to call them out, especially when you see them harassing PoC. If a PoC wants to speak up, let them. But there’s a difference between collecting your folk (always welcome) and flat out talking over us/speaking FOR us (big no-no). Learn the difference.

8. It’s not our jobs to educate white people on their racism, so don’t expect us to. There are PoC who do like to educate, paid or unpaid. Go see them. For an alternate option, open Google and you’ll have all that shit at your fingertips within seconds. But when a PoC is calling you out, they might not feel like giving you an in depth history lesson on the background of that particular act of racism, and to act like they owe it to you is entitlement. If we feel like educating, we will. In fact, there are plenty of Tumblr blogs created with the sole purpose of educating you on racism. Racismschool is a perfect example.

9. That being said, listen to PoC when they talk about racism. If you prefer listening to white people talk about the racism PoC face, rather than listening to PoC, there’s a problem. Tim Wise and other white people say something about racism, and y’all act like this is brand new information and omg he’s BRILLIANT wow so insightful. No, bitch, we’ve been saying this shit for CENTURIES, and white people are just regurgitating what WE said. It’s just that when PoC talk about our experiences, we’re seen as ~reverse racist~ and emotionally biased, and somehow, white people are able to talk about racism objectively even though they have no experience with racism aside from fucking people over with it.

10. If it seems to you that “no matter what white people do, there’s no way they can interact with a PoC without offending them,” then that says a lot about how you view anti-racist discourse, and it’s time for you to take a step back and try again. Instead of reading it as, “white people fuck up everything” try reading it as “I’m frustrated with white people/white supremacy, and here is why…” Most of the shit you read from us flat out GIVES you the answers you’re looking for in one way or another. It’s really not that hard. Stop looking too far into shit.

11. Instead of getting defensive and trivializing issues because you don’t think it’s a big deal why are you so offended by this you’re being over sensitive the world is so PC omg bawwwwwwwww …… LISTEN. And even if you don’t get why what you did/said was offensive, understand that it WAS offensive, period, and just don’t do it again. Sometimes, understanding isn’t necessary, and sometimes you won’t be able to understand, no matter how hard you try. You don’t have to; just stop.

12. Stop saying “nigga.” This goes for white people AND non-Black PoC alike. It’s not cool for you to do it. Black people say it to reclaim it. White people say it, why? Y’all have nothing to reclaim with that word. Non-Black PoC have no business using it either.

13. Yes, that means in songs, too. Y’all can’t sing it just because it’s part of the lyrics. Either mute yourself for half a second, or stop listening to the song until you can gain enough self control to shut the hell up for one word.

14. Seriously, if you aren’t Black, you can’t say it. Ever. EVER. EVER.

15. While we’re at it, when you use a racial slur and PoC who fall victim to that slur call you out on it, for god’s sake, stop saying it.

16. Recognize that the world doesn’t revolve around white people, despite the ways in which the world will try to tell you it does. (For instance, don’t call us non-white, because that makes, once again, white people the default human and everyone who isn’t white becomes a niche or subtype. You probably didn’t even realize that’s what you were doing, did you? Which is what I mean when I say that this shit is subtle, and engrained in us to the point where it’s hard to detect. Which is fine; sometimes, you just don’t know. It happens. Just be aware that you can only use “I didn’t know” as an excuse once. After you’re informed, you have no excuse. By the way, for future reference, “PoC” will work just fine.)


17. PoC don’t owe you shit and it would behoove you to not act like we do; when you’re ignorant, we don’t owe you niceness. If you did something that dehumanized us, why would you expect us to be nice to you anyway? That’s abuser logic, racism, and fucked uppedness all rolled into one disgusting package, and if you expect us to swallow it either whole or in pieces, you need to get slapped with a cactus, to be frank.

18. Don’t appropriate. If PoC walk around in our own things, we get harassed, assaulted, told to go back to our countries, viewed as suspicious, and at worst, killed. But when white people wear them, it’s cute, trendy, and omg, you’re so worldly. Our cultures are not costumes, fashion trends, or objects to be picked over, the pretty parts taken and the rest discarded. Even if you’re wearing it to appreciate our culture? Don’t. Appropriation isn’t appreciation, it’s disrespect. Period. (And if you think that “Well then maybe you should take off your jeans since those are from white culture and you’re appropriating har har” is an intelligent response then please dip your lips in hot wax, because no no NO.)

19. “NOT ALL WHITE PEOPLE—” Shut the fuck up.

20. Just because one PoC doesn’t find something racist to be offensive, doesn’t mean that it suddenly isn’t offensive, and that it’s okay for you to continue on with whatever you’re doing. For examples, see 15.

21. If you’re being called out for something, recognize how much energy this person is out right now. Seriously, calling people out isn’t fun, because we KNOW how it’s likely to be received. We KNOW what people are likely to think about us. We KNOW how people are likely to take a call out.We KNOW that nine times out of ten, we’re just going to be shut down. We have to pick our battles; if we called out everything, we’d be calling shit out every second of our lives. (And it’s not fair that we have to let some things pass silently, because that gives the impression that what was said/done is okay and not problematic, which isn’t true) It’s not fun. It’s not something we look forward to doing. So when we DO do it, please just listen. Please recognize that it’s not us trying to kill your fun or ruin your day, or us hating you or thinking you’re a terrible person. We’re just trying to gain back the piece of our humanity that you put your foot all over.

22. Being called a racist isn’t worse than whatever racist act you just committed/racist thing you said. So save your boo hoo hurt fee-fee tears for somebody who gives a fuck because I guarantee it won’t be us. Also, being called out for doing something offensive doesn’t mean we called you racist. It doesn’t even mean we think you’re racist. It means you did something problematic and we’re trying to correct you on it so that you won’t do it again.

23. So you got called out and it upset you. Go cry me a god damn river. Guess what? Being called out isn’t SUPPOSED to feel good. It’s not supposed to feel like a pat on the back. Expecting a call out to feel good is like denying somebodies humanity and then expecting them to give you hugs and cookies in return. No, it’s not LIKE that, it IS that. In the same vein, if you get called out by more than one person, and choose to listen to the one who you think was nicer about it? Then fuck you. Both are people expressing their hurt and both are valid, and for you to ignore one in favor of the other—and especially to praise them via “Thank you for being polite/carrying on an intelligent discourse rather than screaming incoherently/etc etc etc” is tone policing as well as trying to set up a Good PoC, Bad PoC dichotomy, and fuck you very much if you engage in that.

24. Whatever racist thing you did or said, you’re not the first white person we’ve dealt with who has done/said it. You’re probably somewhere in the thousands. Know what that means? We’ve dealt with others exactly like you, several times over. That gets annoying the second time around. By the time you strike, we’re fed up with it. So if we just tell you to fuck off, please respect our wishes and do so. We deal with micro-aggressions and blatant and subtle racism day in and day out, every single day, from the day we are born until the day that we die. So if we aren’t the nicest to you, don’t get mad at us for not being polite enough. Be mad at yourself for having done/said something racist and making our day just a little bit shittier with your ignorance. Your racist acts are your fault. You did em. Don’t get mad when you have to deal with consequences for them. If we’re old enough to deal with racism at fucking two years old, then you’re old enough to deal with the consequences at 15, 16, 20, 30,56, 89, 314.

25. Keeping all of the above in mind, remember that we’re all individuals. The best way to deal with PoC is by treating us like the human beings we are, and being constantly aware of your privilege. When you fuck up, apologize, try not to do it again, and move on. It’s not that hard.

26. Cracker isn’t a racial slur. Neither is honky. Neither is curdled milk, cottage cheese, mayonnaise, or white bread. Let it drop. Sorry you aren’t oppressed for your skin color, white people. It must suck not having to deal with racial oppression. Truly. I’m sorry for your misfortune.

27. Intersectionality or shut the fuck up. PoC come in all flavors. We’re queer. We have mental health issues. We have disabilities. We deal with sizeism, misogyny, ableism, and so on. If you think bringing up race in conversations about other oppressions is inappropriate, then take a long hard seat and stay down until summoned.

28. “It’s just a word, it only has as much power as you give it.” NO.

29. Having a PoC spouse, S.O., family member, acquaintance, co-worker, doesn’t mean you can’t be racist or do racist shit. You can, you have, and you will again. And if you make that argument and use them as your get out of jail free card, you’re being racist in that moment because you’re turning them into an excuse to combat being called out for acting like a fucking fool.

If the above is too difficult or too much for you, then there is an alternate solution:

1. Stay away from all PoC, and don’t engage with a single one until you’ve changed your attitude because the last thing PoC need is to be exposed to your ignorance and lack of consideration for their humanity.

Remember that there’s way more than what I’ve listed. Anything here that upset you or made you feel uncomfortable, you should go back and read again, and question very carefully why it made you upset, and then confront your issues. And if I somehow pissed you off, just remember… you asked.

Ok then someone edited this post, completely erased the initial commentary above and REPLACED all 30 pts with this

professor-mod:

Just act normally and treat everybody the same way.  If you treat people differently because of their skin color, that’s being racist, even if you are treating non-white people better than because of their skin color.  Honestly, if you spend enough time not thinking about race, it stops being an issue to you, and if someone gets upset with you for treating everyone equally, well, that’s damn racist of them for expecting you to treat certain groups differently.  It is not an individual’s responsibility to apologize for society.  It is an individual’s job to treat everyone with respect, basic human dignity, and have equal expectations of others regardless of their complexion.  Honestly the only reason this still keeps coming up is that some some people are being racist.  You don’t solve the problem harping on it, you solve the problem by stopping doing it.

Can anyone else see how and why the silencing professor-mod did was bad?
Struggling To Be Heard: Whack Jobs Are Not the Problem (You Are)

blackgirldangerous:

by Mia McKenzie

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote a post about why I don’t talk to strange white people about race. Basically, what it boils down to is that those conversations are too unpredictable (or, too predictable, maybe), can be scary, and are almost always…

polerin:

whiskeyandcupcakes:

peecharrific:

Saw this yesterday on my way into work. See so many of them around this area, they sort of all blend together. But this one was just… literally too big to ignore. Ahhh white people.

The first dozen times I saw one of these was in my home state… of Michigan.
I shit you not, no one has ever told the white folks of the Mitten that we are not, and have never been a Confederate state.

Friend of mine from Canada tells me the rednecks up there fly it too.
Tradition and history… riiiiiiiiight…

polerin:

whiskeyandcupcakes:

peecharrific:

Saw this yesterday on my way into work. See so many of them around this area, they sort of all blend together. But this one was just… literally too big to ignore. Ahhh white people.

The first dozen times I saw one of these was in my home state… of Michigan.

I shit you not, no one has ever told the white folks of the Mitten that we are not, and have never been a Confederate state.

Friend of mine from Canada tells me the rednecks up there fly it too.

Tradition and history… riiiiiiiiight…

(Source: peechingtonmariejust)

Dear White Women,

zorascreation:

Many Women of Color have called you out on your whitewashing of their issues in relation to racial injustice and how it affects things central to women’s experiences across the planet. Many of you have learned from these experiences about how to navigate your White Privilege while still being a disenfranchised gender-group. However, I don’t think much attention has been payed (despite negative attention) to how Men of Color relate to you all.

Now, I’m genderqueer, but as I’ve said before Black Man/Man of Color is my politicized identity based on how [some] people may perceive me and have in the past. Even though I was raised-as-a-boy, I’ve still always been gender-bending/genderqueer, and people have “misgendered” me as a woman as I’ve gained in age (thanks to mama’s genes! <3). But, because I am still affected by MOC issues, it’s time I spoke out a bit more.

Tip for the future: if you think to take it upon yourself to dictate to a Man of Color about how works such as “Othello” relate to him and his maleness? Do not. It is a crime against your critical thinking skills. I think that many times you all don’t realize how MOC are, like you, privileged and non-privileged in two major areas. Except for MOC it’s the reverse of WW’s experiences. For MOC it’s “of color while men” and for WW it’s “white while women”. There are levels of privilege and power in play for MOC that do not always translate to a universal experience of Patriarchy due to White Supremacy.

For instance, when speaking about how Patriarchy hurts men, I’ve noticed that MOC do not gain any sort of acknowledgement in these discussions unless the discussion is being held between WOC. This is only natural because you [White Women] do not suffer from institutional racism and thus issues relating to race have always been unseen to you. The racial-gender hierarchy in much of the Western World, and even in non-Western countries affected by Colonialism, Imperalism and Eurocentrism, pits White Women above MOC. Sometimes, as bell hooks has illustrated, MOC and White Women may share the same societal status by the factors of Maleness for MOC and Whiteness for White Women, but it’s incumbent upon White Women to holistically realize how male repression has forever been used as an oppressive tool against MOC by White Women themselves.

racemash:

For those who think blacks in America are imagining racism or blowing things out of proportion:
Fact: Black youths arrested for drug possession are 48 times more likely to wind up in prison than white youths arrested for the same crime under the same circumstances.
Source: “Young White Offenders get lighter treatment,” 2000. The Tennessean. April 26: 8A.
Fact: Black and Latino men are three times more likely than white men to be stopped by the police and have their cars searched – even though white men are four times more likely to have weapons or drugs.
Source: Matthew R. Durose, Erica L. Schmitt and Patrick A. Langan, Contacts Between Police and the Public: Findings from the 2002 National Survey. U.S. Department of Justice, (Bureau of Justice Statistics), April 2005.
Fact: White men with a criminal record are more likely to be called back for a job interview than black men with no record, even when their education and experience are the same.
Source: Pager, Devah. 2003. “The Mark of a Criminal Record.” American Journal of Sociology. Volume 108: 5, March: 937-75.
Fact: Students of colour are far less likely to be put in honours courses even after you take test scores and grades into account.
Source: Gordon, Rebecca. 1998. Education and Race. Oakland: Applied Research Center: 48-9; Fischer, Claude S. et al., 1996. Inequality by Design: Cracking the Bell Curve Myth. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press: 163; Steinhorn, Leonard and Barabara Diggs-Brown, 1999. By the Color of Our Skin: The Illusion of Integration and the Reality of Race. NY: Dutton: 95-6.
Fact: Students of colour are more than twice as likely to be suspended or expelled from school even though they are not much more likely to break school rules than whites.
Source: Skiba, Russell J. et al., The Color of Discipline: Sources of Racial and Gender Disproportionality in School Punishment. Indiana Education Policy Center, Policy Research Report SRS1, June 2000; U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System: Youth 2003, Online Comprehensive Results, 2004.
For those who think White Americans have a good feel for how racist their country is:
Fact: In 1962, 85% of whites thought that black children in their community had just as good a chance of getting a good education as white children.
Source: The Gallup Organization, Gallup Poll Social Audit, 2001. Black-White Relations in the United States, 2001 Update, July 10: 7-9.
Fact: In 1969 nearly half of all whites (45%) believed that blacks had a better chance getting a good-paying job than they did.
Source: Newsweek/Gallup Organization, National Opinion Survey, August 19, 1969.
Those last two are from the 1960s – a period of history far enough in the past for even whites to see the racism that went on.
The above comes from an excellent article by Tim Wise, “What Kind of Card is Race?” (2006). As he puts it:

In every era, black folks said they were the victims of racism and they were right. In every era, whites have said the problem was exaggerated, and we have been wrong.


reblog since this post got more notes than some of the others here

racemash:

For those who think blacks in America are imagining racism or blowing things out of proportion:

Fact: Black youths arrested for drug possession are 48 times more likely to wind up in prison than white youths arrested for the same crime under the same circumstances.

Source: “Young White Offenders get lighter treatment,” 2000. The Tennessean. April 26: 8A.

Fact: Black and Latino men are three times more likely than white men to be stopped by the police and have their cars searched – even though white men are four times more likely to have weapons or drugs.

Source: Matthew R. Durose, Erica L. Schmitt and Patrick A. Langan, Contacts Between Police and the Public: Findings from the 2002 National Survey. U.S. Department of Justice, (Bureau of Justice Statistics), April 2005.

Fact: White men with a criminal record are more likely to be called back for a job interview than black men with no record, even when their education and experience are the same.

Source: Pager, Devah. 2003. “The Mark of a Criminal Record.” American Journal of Sociology. Volume 108: 5, March: 937-75.

Fact: Students of colour are far less likely to be put in honours courses even after you take test scores and grades into account.

Source: Gordon, Rebecca. 1998. Education and Race. Oakland: Applied Research Center: 48-9; Fischer, Claude S. et al., 1996. Inequality by Design: Cracking the Bell Curve Myth. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press: 163; Steinhorn, Leonard and Barabara Diggs-Brown, 1999. By the Color of Our Skin: The Illusion of Integration and the Reality of Race. NY: Dutton: 95-6.

Fact: Students of colour are more than twice as likely to be suspended or expelled from school even though they are not much more likely to break school rules than whites.

Source: Skiba, Russell J. et al., The Color of Discipline: Sources of Racial and Gender Disproportionality in School Punishment. Indiana Education Policy Center, Policy Research Report SRS1, June 2000; U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System: Youth 2003, Online Comprehensive Results, 2004.

For those who think White Americans have a good feel for how racist their country is:

Fact: In 1962, 85% of whites thought that black children in their community had just as good a chance of getting a good education as white children.

Source: The Gallup Organization, Gallup Poll Social Audit, 2001. Black-White Relations in the United States, 2001 Update, July 10: 7-9.

Fact: In 1969 nearly half of all whites (45%) believed that blacks had a better chance getting a good-paying job than they did.

Source: Newsweek/Gallup Organization, National Opinion Survey, August 19, 1969.

Those last two are from the 1960s – a period of history far enough in the past for even whites to see the racism that went on.

The above comes from an excellent article by Tim Wise, “What Kind of Card is Race?” (2006). As he puts it:

In every era, black folks said they were the victims of racism and they were right. In every era, whites have said the problem was exaggerated, and we have been wrong.

reblog since this post got more notes than some of the others here

Marginalized races shouldn’t have to make room for the odd non-racist white person, it’s understandable to have an instant mistrust towards most white people considering the way systems of power and oppression work. For many black etc people, even being around white people induces feelings of unsafety in relation to their mental and physical well-being
- Chelsea on the absurdity of claims of “BUT NOT ALL WHITE PEOPLE ARE LIKE THAT!!” (via brazenbitch)

inconsequentialgoat:

CNN: How Tucson schools changed after Mexican-American studies ban

The Governing Board of the Tucson Unified School District voted January 10 to suspended its Mexican-American studies program after an administrative law judge ruled it violated a new state law and the state said the local district was going to lose $15 million in annual aid. In a district where 60% of the 53,000 students are Latino, some said they felt like Chicano or Mexican-American perspectives on history have become unacceptable.

This week, seven textbooks associated with the Mexican-American studies program were removed from classrooms, provoking claims of censorship. District leaders said they aren’t banning the books, but have removed them from classrooms while their content is evaluated.

The district’s Governing Board President, Mark Stegeman, said that copies of some of the books were still available in school libraries. But a search of the Tucson district’s school library online catalog, only a handful of copies of each book were available in any of the 11 high school libraries searchable online.

"I feel really disheartened," said Maria Therese Mejia, a senior at Tucson Magnet High School. "Those are our history, you know? It’s ridiculous for them to be taking away our education. They’re taking (the books) to storage where no one can use them."

Opponents of the book removals say district leaders cut off access to books that give an account of American history from the perspective of Latinos and indigenous people who lived in the Southwest long before Arizona was a state. The books were removed from classrooms on Friday, in at least one instance during class as students looked on.

The Tucson Unified School District issued a statement late Tuesday calling reports of book banning “completely false and misleading.”

Contrary to earlier reports which indicated that dozens of books listed as class materials had been taken away, the statement said only seven titles were affected:

"Critical Race Theory," by Richard Delgado
"500 Years of Chicano History in Pictures," edited by Elizabeth Martinez
"Message to AZTLAN," by Rodolfo Corky Gonzales
"Chicano! The History of the Mexican Civil Rights Movement," by Arturo Rosales
"OccupiedAmerica: A History of Chicanos," by Rodolfo Acuna
"Pedagogy of the Oppressed," by Paulo Freire
"Rethinking Columbus: The Next 500 Years," edited by Bill Bigelow and Bob Peterson

"Each book has been boxed and stored as part of the process of suspending the classes," the statement read. "The books listed above were cited in the ruling that found the classes out of compliance with state law."

Arizona State Superintendent John Huppenthal ordered on January 6 that about 10% of the district’s state funding, about $15 million over the course of a year, be withheld, retroactive to August 15, 2011, if it did not dismantle its Mexican-American studies courses.

That order followed a December administrative law ruling that the program was teaching “in a biased, political and emotionally charged manner,” and upheld a state finding that it violated a 2010 law that bans ethnic studies classes which “promote the overthrow of the U.S. government, promote resentment toward a race or class of people, are designed primarily for pupils of a particular ethnic group or advocate ethnic solidarity instead of the treatment of pupils as individuals.” In Tucson, only  Mexican-American studies classes were affected.

(read more)

So white lawmakers have determined that Mexican-American and Indigenous views of history are unacceptable, even if it’s their own history.

This is pathetic.  Clearly these white racists are scared of a non-white point of view.  Scared of PoC becoming enlightened and not swallowing a bunch of standard whitewashed history lessons to keep them complacent.  Scared of anything that might dismantle the white supremacist hegemony that keeps whites at the top of the social hierarchy at the expense of non-white races.

Oh gosh…there I go.

thatneedstogo:

“Shit White Girls Say…To Black Girls” is not racist (via Clutch Magazine)

HEY OTHER WHITE PEOPLE.

thegovernmentstolemygermscd:

ITS NOT UP TO US TO DECIDE WHAT IS OR ISN’T OFFENSIVE TO OTHER CULTURES.

/END.

makeluvalldaylong:

I’m sorry but seeing how 48763489 billion people are talking about racism on my dash and getting their panties up in a bunch. who the FUCK CARES if someone else is racist, doesn’t really matter hm? nope. have your opinions and let people have theirs. move on and get the fuck over it.

People lives are affected every single day in immensely negative ways (education, health care, job/career opportunities) because of something that “doesn’t matter”.

But please, continue exercising your white privilege and continue to complain about people discussing real issues that you seem to be above.

extension147:

Tom: You know, if I had a black son, I would name him Royal.
Me: What? Why?
Tom: I don’t know. It’s a good black name.
Me: Why would you ever have a black son? You don’t even like black people.
Tom: That’s a very good question…

So your friend is racist, you don’t call him out on it, and you proceed to say “he’s still awesome”.

I don’t normally like to directly cuss people out in text/reblogs/whatever, but fuck you and all the other racism enabling pathetic dickwads like you.
People always wonder why racism is still around, and in part of it is because of people like you. 

For those who think blacks in America are imagining racism or blowing things out of proportion:
Fact: Black youths arrested for drug possession are 48 times more likely to wind up in prison than white youths arrested for the same crime under the same circumstances.
Source: “Young White Offenders get lighter treatment,” 2000. The Tennessean. April 26: 8A.
Fact: Black and Latino men are three times more likely than white men to be stopped by the police and have their cars searched – even though white men are four times more likely to have weapons or drugs.
Source: Matthew R. Durose, Erica L. Schmitt and Patrick A. Langan, Contacts Between Police and the Public: Findings from the 2002 National Survey. U.S. Department of Justice, (Bureau of Justice Statistics), April 2005.
Fact: White men with a criminal record are more likely to be called back for a job interview than black men with no record, even when their education and experience are the same.
Source: Pager, Devah. 2003. “The Mark of a Criminal Record.” American Journal of Sociology. Volume 108: 5, March: 937-75.
Fact: Students of colour are far less likely to be put in honours courses even after you take test scores and grades into account.
Source: Gordon, Rebecca. 1998. Education and Race. Oakland: Applied Research Center: 48-9; Fischer, Claude S. et al., 1996. Inequality by Design: Cracking the Bell Curve Myth. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press: 163; Steinhorn, Leonard and Barabara Diggs-Brown, 1999. By the Color of Our Skin: The Illusion of Integration and the Reality of Race. NY: Dutton: 95-6.
Fact: Students of colour are more than twice as likely to be suspended or expelled from school even though they are not much more likely to break school rules than whites.
Source: Skiba, Russell J. et al., The Color of Discipline: Sources of Racial and Gender Disproportionality in School Punishment. Indiana Education Policy Center, Policy Research Report SRS1, June 2000; U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System: Youth 2003, Online Comprehensive Results, 2004.
For those who think White Americans have a good feel for how racist their country is:
Fact: In 1962, 85% of whites thought that black children in their community had just as good a chance of getting a good education as white children.
Source: The Gallup Organization, Gallup Poll Social Audit, 2001. Black-White Relations in the United States, 2001 Update, July 10: 7-9.
Fact: In 1969 nearly half of all whites (45%) believed that blacks had a better chance getting a good-paying job than they did.
Source: Newsweek/Gallup Organization, National Opinion Survey, August 19, 1969.
Those last two are from the 1960s – a period of history far enough in the past for even whites to see the racism that went on.
The above comes from an excellent article by Tim Wise, “What Kind of Card is Race?” (2006). As he puts it:

In every era, black folks said they were the victims of racism and they were right. In every era, whites have said the problem was exaggerated, and we have been wrong.

For those who think blacks in America are imagining racism or blowing things out of proportion:

Fact: Black youths arrested for drug possession are 48 times more likely to wind up in prison than white youths arrested for the same crime under the same circumstances.

Source: “Young White Offenders get lighter treatment,” 2000. The Tennessean. April 26: 8A.

Fact: Black and Latino men are three times more likely than white men to be stopped by the police and have their cars searched – even though white men are four times more likely to have weapons or drugs.

Source: Matthew R. Durose, Erica L. Schmitt and Patrick A. Langan, Contacts Between Police and the Public: Findings from the 2002 National Survey. U.S. Department of Justice, (Bureau of Justice Statistics), April 2005.

Fact: White men with a criminal record are more likely to be called back for a job interview than black men with no record, even when their education and experience are the same.

Source: Pager, Devah. 2003. “The Mark of a Criminal Record.” American Journal of Sociology. Volume 108: 5, March: 937-75.

Fact: Students of colour are far less likely to be put in honours courses even after you take test scores and grades into account.

Source: Gordon, Rebecca. 1998. Education and Race. Oakland: Applied Research Center: 48-9; Fischer, Claude S. et al., 1996. Inequality by Design: Cracking the Bell Curve Myth. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press: 163; Steinhorn, Leonard and Barabara Diggs-Brown, 1999. By the Color of Our Skin: The Illusion of Integration and the Reality of Race. NY: Dutton: 95-6.

Fact: Students of colour are more than twice as likely to be suspended or expelled from school even though they are not much more likely to break school rules than whites.

Source: Skiba, Russell J. et al., The Color of Discipline: Sources of Racial and Gender Disproportionality in School Punishment. Indiana Education Policy Center, Policy Research Report SRS1, June 2000; U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System: Youth 2003, Online Comprehensive Results, 2004.

For those who think White Americans have a good feel for how racist their country is:

Fact: In 1962, 85% of whites thought that black children in their community had just as good a chance of getting a good education as white children.

Source: The Gallup Organization, Gallup Poll Social Audit, 2001. Black-White Relations in the United States, 2001 Update, July 10: 7-9.

Fact: In 1969 nearly half of all whites (45%) believed that blacks had a better chance getting a good-paying job than they did.

Source: Newsweek/Gallup Organization, National Opinion Survey, August 19, 1969.

Those last two are from the 1960s – a period of history far enough in the past for even whites to see the racism that went on.

The above comes from an excellent article by Tim Wise, “What Kind of Card is Race?” (2006). As he puts it:

In every era, black folks said they were the victims of racism and they were right. In every era, whites have said the problem was exaggerated, and we have been wrong.

The triple consciousness of an ‘other’ person of color

downlo:

Something I find exasperating is how badly some Americans react to the suggestion that conversation about racism in the U.S. needs to exceed the traditional black-white dichotomy (because U.S. racism itself exceeds the traditional black-white dichotomy).

Saying the racial conversation needs to include more subjects than just White racism against Blacks is sometimes taken to be a call to gloss over Black oppression. And that is just. Not. True. What it actually is is an attempt to deepen and enrich that account. For example, you just can’t fully discuss racist citizenship laws without accounting for slavery and the Reconstruction Amendments and the Chinese Exclusion Acts and the legal treatment of Native American/Amerindian reservations and xenophobia and nativism inspired by 19th century Irish and Southern and Eastern European immigrants. Leave any of that out and you don’t get a complete and nuanced picture of racial and racist laws pertaining to U.S. citizenship. Talking about all of that history doesn’t necessarily downplay any particular piece of it.

Saying the racial conversation needs to include more subjects than just White racism against Blacks is also an acknowledgment that the history of White racism against non-Black people of color is less widely know, less frequently discussed, and more often treated as secondary or side issues…which just compounds the alienation! On one side, you have the establishment denying your oppression because some (‘Asian’ = a huge, diverse group) members of your group have been doing conspicuously well in recent decades…and then other POC are doing the same thing for essentially the same reason? 

It is beyond frustrating when points that exceed the Back/White racial binary—like the lynching of Asian (and Latino) people, immigration and citizenship laws that specifically excluded your nationality from even entering the country, and being a safe target of racist humor even now—are subtly dismissed as being whiny. And that calls for POC solidarity by Asians are viewed as suspect and insincere.

Look, no serious Asian anti-racist activist would ever seek to mitigate or ignore Black oppression. In fact, like most anti-racist resistance movements, we’ve long looked towards Black Americans in defining our own struggles with White power and privilege, but in doing so, we’ve come to realize that our experience is distinct.

For the purposes of anti-racist struggles, Asian anti-racists probably occupy a socio-political space that is closer to that occupied by Latin immigrants due to the transnational, post-colonial nature of both our struggles. Work by Juan Flores and recent Asian/South Asian, Latino and Caribbean critical race theory have informed my own thoughts about these issues. Racism, imperialism, and othering by both Whites and non-Whites are intersecting oppressions that don’t affect ‘just’ Asian people of color in the U.S. (and if you suggest the ideas in the following passage could only apply to Black immigrants, then I know you are beyond hope):

[I]n studying the…the experience of the United States Afro-Latino, one ever feels his threeness: A Latino, A Negro, an American…

To be clear, the use of the catchy term, “triple consciousness” is not intended to trump or one-up African American particularity and struggle but rather only to point to the increased complexities of the “color line” in light of the transnational nature of present-day social experience. For when in The Souls of Black Folks Du Bois so momentously declared the problem of the twentieth century to be the color line, he was not speaking strictly of African Americans but of “the relation of the darker to the lighter races of men in Asia and Africa, in America and the islands of the sea.” He recognized over a hundred years ago that these crucial social differentiations were not national but global in scope.

The experience of Afro-Latin@s in the United States and the emergent realities of the new century impel us, in tune with Du Bois’s critical legacy, to further advance an integral global vision of race, and at the same time to articulate a keener awareness of specificities and internal complexities both within and across the amplified range of groups. Here again, Du Bois’s choice of language is of key interest, for in The Souls of Black Folk, we have the crucial linkage of a class dimension with the heralding of cultural awakening among the oppressed nations and peoples; the word, “folk”, which harbors both a class and racial referent, holds the key to comprehending the new Black and Latin@ diversity and to hailing our elusive yet persistent goal, “the dawn of freedom.”

The Afro-Latin Reader: History and Culture in the United States, Miriam Jiménez-Román & Juan Flores, (2010) p. 15

And that’s my last word on the subject. If you don’t get it by now, no amount of blog posts and Du Bois quotes on the subject will make you get it.

A blog dealing with racial issues across different social intersections. While we do focus on the black/white binary there are also many posts on other non-black POC groups. As we mostly reblog or gather info from other sources, things do slip the net from time to time so please let us know if anything you see here is plagiarized or needs to be taken down.